technotranceremex
sinosauropteryx

sinosauropteryx:

this may be one of my favorite blog posts about theropods i’ve ever read. check out the link and read on for more.

dinodorks

mucholderthen:

Theropods
In Green-Mamba's DINOSAURIA Series”
SCALE illustrations are from Wikipedia.

Animalia  >  Chordata  >  Sauropsida  >  Dinosauria  >  Theropoda
Theropod dinosaurs include ancestors of modern birds.

#20 Utahraptor ostrommaysorum
Barremian age, lower Cretaceous (126 million years ago)
7 meters long | 500 kg
Utah [US]
_____________________________

#16 Therizinosaurus cheloniformis 
Campanian age, upper Cretaceous (70 million years ago)
10 meters |  5000 kg (5.5 tons)
Ömnögovi, Mongolia
_____________________________

#8 Caudipteryx zoui
Aptian age, lower Cretaceous (124 million years ago)
90 cm (3ft) | 2 kg 
Liaoning Province, China

dinodorks

Aerosteon riocoloradense

a-dinosaur-a-day:

image

Source: http://jogosonlinerp.blogspot.com/2014/02/aerosteon.html

NameAerosteon riocoloradense 

Name Meaning:Río Colorado Air Bone

First Described: 2009

Described By: Sereno et al. 

ClassificationDinosauria, Saurischia, Theropoda, Neotheropoda, Averostra, Tetanurae, Orionides, Avetheropoda, Allosauroidea, Allosauria, Carcharodontosauria, Neovenatoridae, Megaraptora

Aerosteon was another megaraptorid that was about 9 meters long and a little over 3 meters high. It was found in the Anacleto Formation in Argentina, and it lived in the Santonian stage of the Late Cretaceous, about 84 million years ago. Its classification is under some debate and it has been considered a tyrannosauroid. As it is only known from scattered remains, more specimens should be found before any real conclusions can be made about its classification. It had air filled spaces in its bones, giving it very lightweight bones and its possible that it had an avian like respiratory system, making me fairly convinced it should be rendered with feathers. This would have allowed for greater airflow to and from Aerosteon’s lung, allowing it to regulate its temperature and breathe faster, making it a very active predator. 

Sources: 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aerosteon

http://www.prehistoric-wildlife.com/species/a/aerosteon.html

Shout out goes to xtori34!

dinodorks

dino-sours:

Know Your T. rex!

There are dozens of Tyrannosaurus skeletons on display around the world, but most are casts of a handful of specimens.

AMNH 5027

The first T. rex ever exhibited, and for most of the 20th century the only nearly complete specimen known. Look for a boxier skull, oversized legs borrowed from the T. rex holotype, feet based on Allosaurus, and filled-in fenestrae on older casts.

As Seen At: American Museum of Natural History, Denver Museum of Nature and Science, Academy of Natural Sciences, National Museum of Natural History (skull), Peabody Museum of Natural History (skull)

The Nation’s T. rex - MOR 555

Discovered by rancher Kathy Wankel on Army Corps of Engineers land. Currently on loan to the Smithsonian. Look for longer, lankier legs, and an inaccurately reconstructed sloped snout on cast skulls.

As Seen At: Royal Ontario Museum, Museum of the Rockies, National Museum of Scotland, Perot Museum of Nature and Science, National Museum of Natural History (in 2019)

Stan – BHI 3033

By far the most duplicated and most exhibited dinosaur in the world. Look for excessively long teeth and a perforated jaw.

As Seen At: Black Hills Institute, Children’s Museum of Indianapolis, National Museum of Natural History, Dinosaur Discovery Museum, Houston Museum of Natural Science, Manchester Museum, Tokyo National Museum of Natural Science, traveling exhibits

Sue – FMNH PR2081

Discovered by Susan Hendrickson and the subject of an ugly 3-year legal battle before being purchased by the Field Museum. The oldest and most complete T. rex known. Look for a longer snout and stubby cocker spaniel legs.

As Seen At: Field Museum of Natural History, Disney World Animal Kingdom, traveling exhibits

Jane – BMRP 2002.4.1

A juvenile Tyrannosaurus discovered in 2001. Look for a scrawny build, gracile legs and a narrow skull.

As Seen At: Burpee Museum of Natural History, Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County

dinodorks

Mapusaurus roseae

a-dinosaur-a-day:

image

Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/life/Mapusaurus

Name: Mapusaurus roseae 

Name Meaning: Rose Earth Lizard

First Described: 2006

Described By: Coria & Currie 

ClassificationDinosauria, Saurischia, Theropoda, Neotheropoda, Averostra, Tetanurae, Orionides, Avetheropoda, Carnosauria, Allosauroidea, Allosauria, Carcharodontosauria, Carcharodontosauridae, Giganotosaurini 

Mapusaurus was yet another huge carnosaur from the Cenomanian stage of the Late Cretaceous, about 95 million years ago. It was found in the Huincul Formation in Argentina and was a contemporary of its close cousin Giganotosaurus. Its original discovery was amongst seven other individuals, making it probable that it hunted in packs. This completely challenged the notion that predatory dinosaurs were solitary animals. The individuals in the bone bed were all different ages and no other species were present, supporting the pack hunting hypothesis. Since it lived alongside Argentinosaurus, it probably used pack hunting to bring down the huge prey animals available to it, targeting weaker members of the herd and waging a war of attrition on them. It is possible that this was just a depositional area from a stream or a river, but given the lack of other specimens, I doubt it. 

image

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mapusaurus

Mapusaurus, like Giganotosaurus, had flat and curved teeth with a serrated edge, built for slicing through flesh. The packs of Mapusaurus would probably slice through the Argentinosaurus and wear down the animal with shock, blood loss and infection. It differs from Giganotosaurus in a few ways, mainly in the shape of its skull, arms, pelvis, and legs. However the two are very similar. It was at least 10 meters long but probably longer, and three meters high. Mapusaurus also lived with Cathartesaura and the abelisauroids Skorpiovenator and Ilokelesia, which would likely have competed with it for food.  

image

http://fineartamerica.com/featured/a-couple-of-predator-mapusaurus-try-sergey-krasovskiy.html

Sources: 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mapusaurus

http://www.prehistoric-wildlife.com/species/m/mapusaurus.html

http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/life/Mapusaurus

Shout out goes to my friend sylph0fl1ght!

infinitemachine
infinitemachine:

Dinosaur of the Day: Metriacanthosaurus parkeri by atrox1

Metriacanthosaurus
Family: Metriacanthosauridae
Location: England
Time: Mid-Jurassic
Size (length): 7-8m (23-26ft)
Notes: I’ve been looking for a good image of Metriacanthosaurus since, oh, the first installment of Dinosaur of the Day. I’d prefer one without a watermark, but this will do in the meantime.

infinitemachine:

Dinosaur of the Day: Metriacanthosaurus parkeri by atrox1

Metriacanthosaurus
Family: Metriacanthosauridae
Location: England
Time: Mid-Jurassic
Size (length): 7-8m (23-26ft)
Notes: I’ve been looking for a good image of Metriacanthosaurus since, oh, the first installment of Dinosaur of the Day. I’d prefer one without a watermark, but this will do in the meantime.