archosaurophilia
archosaurophilia:

The Kagu (Rhynochetos jubatus) is a curious bird native to the montane forests of the French overseas collectivity of New Caledonia. Its placement among the avian family tree has been complicated since the time of its discovery, Once thought to be an ardeid like egrets and herons, it was considered in more recent times to be a gruiform. Of late, it’s usually been allied to the sunbittern of Central and South America, suggesting that the two species may be part of an ancient, Gondwanan radiation of birds.
It’s average-sized so far as ground-dwelling birds go, averaging at around 55 cm long. Strictly carnivorous, its diet consists mostly of invertebrates and small reptiles from the forest floor. Its generic name (‘rhyno’ = nose and ‘chetos’ = corn) stems from the ‘nasal corns’, a pair of flaps over the nostrils unique to the Kagu among all birds.
It is the heraldic bird of New Caledonia, and despite pressure from introduced mammals which has reduced its range on the island, is the focus of a number of dedicated conservation efforts which have seen considerable success.

archosaurophilia:

The Kagu (Rhynochetos jubatus) is a curious bird native to the montane forests of the French overseas collectivity of New Caledonia. Its placement among the avian family tree has been complicated since the time of its discovery, Once thought to be an ardeid like egrets and herons, it was considered in more recent times to be a gruiform. Of late, it’s usually been allied to the sunbittern of Central and South America, suggesting that the two species may be part of an ancient, Gondwanan radiation of birds.

It’s average-sized so far as ground-dwelling birds go, averaging at around 55 cm long. Strictly carnivorous, its diet consists mostly of invertebrates and small reptiles from the forest floor. Its generic name (‘rhyno’ = nose and ‘chetos’ = corn) stems from the ‘nasal corns’, a pair of flaps over the nostrils unique to the Kagu among all birds.

It is the heraldic bird of New Caledonia, and despite pressure from introduced mammals which has reduced its range on the island, is the focus of a number of dedicated conservation efforts which have seen considerable success.

dinodorks

Rapator ornitholestoides

a-dinosaur-a-day:

image

Source: http://www.artistwd.com/joyzine/australia/articles/dinosaurs/rapator.php#.U91WMYBdXY8

NameRapator ornitholestoides 

Name Meaning: Plunderer resembling ornitholestes 

First Described: 1932

Described By: Huene 

ClassificationDinosauria, Saurischia, Theropoda, Neotheropoda, Averostra, Tetanurae, Orionides, Avetheropoda, Coelurosauria, Tyrannoraptora, Tyrannosauroidea, Megaraptora

Rapator is another megaraptor from Australia, found in the Griman Creek Formation of New South Wales. It was about nine meters long but it is only known from a finger bone. It lived in the Aptian stage of the Early Cretaceous, about 105 million years ago. The name is actually thought to be a wrong spelling of the word raptor. Its finger is very similar to that of Ornitholestes, prompting its specific name. After the discovery of Astralovenator, it was classified as a meagaraptoran, and since the two are so similar it was briefly a dubious genus. However, enough differences have been found between the two, and they are separated both by time and by location, making them unlikely to be the same. More material should be found, however, before any more statements about the genus can be made. 

Sources: 

http://www.prehistoric-wildlife.com/species/r/rapator.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rapator

Shout out goes to quitetheconversationalist

technotranceremex
sinosauropteryx

sinosauropteryx:

this may be one of my favorite blog posts about theropods i’ve ever read. check out the link and read on for more.

dinodorks

mucholderthen:

Theropods
In Green-Mamba's DINOSAURIA Series”
SCALE illustrations are from Wikipedia.

Animalia  >  Chordata  >  Sauropsida  >  Dinosauria  >  Theropoda
Theropod dinosaurs include ancestors of modern birds.

#20 Utahraptor ostrommaysorum
Barremian age, lower Cretaceous (126 million years ago)
7 meters long | 500 kg
Utah [US]
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#16 Therizinosaurus cheloniformis 
Campanian age, upper Cretaceous (70 million years ago)
10 meters |  5000 kg (5.5 tons)
Ömnögovi, Mongolia
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#8 Caudipteryx zoui
Aptian age, lower Cretaceous (124 million years ago)
90 cm (3ft) | 2 kg 
Liaoning Province, China

dinodorks

Aerosteon riocoloradense

a-dinosaur-a-day:

image

Source: http://jogosonlinerp.blogspot.com/2014/02/aerosteon.html

NameAerosteon riocoloradense 

Name Meaning:Río Colorado Air Bone

First Described: 2009

Described By: Sereno et al. 

ClassificationDinosauria, Saurischia, Theropoda, Neotheropoda, Averostra, Tetanurae, Orionides, Avetheropoda, Allosauroidea, Allosauria, Carcharodontosauria, Neovenatoridae, Megaraptora

Aerosteon was another megaraptorid that was about 9 meters long and a little over 3 meters high. It was found in the Anacleto Formation in Argentina, and it lived in the Santonian stage of the Late Cretaceous, about 84 million years ago. Its classification is under some debate and it has been considered a tyrannosauroid. As it is only known from scattered remains, more specimens should be found before any real conclusions can be made about its classification. It had air filled spaces in its bones, giving it very lightweight bones and its possible that it had an avian like respiratory system, making me fairly convinced it should be rendered with feathers. This would have allowed for greater airflow to and from Aerosteon’s lung, allowing it to regulate its temperature and breathe faster, making it a very active predator. 

Sources: 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aerosteon

http://www.prehistoric-wildlife.com/species/a/aerosteon.html

Shout out goes to xtori34!

dinodorks

dino-sours:

Know Your T. rex!

There are dozens of Tyrannosaurus skeletons on display around the world, but most are casts of a handful of specimens.

AMNH 5027

The first T. rex ever exhibited, and for most of the 20th century the only nearly complete specimen known. Look for a boxier skull, oversized legs borrowed from the T. rex holotype, feet based on Allosaurus, and filled-in fenestrae on older casts.

As Seen At: American Museum of Natural History, Denver Museum of Nature and Science, Academy of Natural Sciences, National Museum of Natural History (skull), Peabody Museum of Natural History (skull)

The Nation’s T. rex - MOR 555

Discovered by rancher Kathy Wankel on Army Corps of Engineers land. Currently on loan to the Smithsonian. Look for longer, lankier legs, and an inaccurately reconstructed sloped snout on cast skulls.

As Seen At: Royal Ontario Museum, Museum of the Rockies, National Museum of Scotland, Perot Museum of Nature and Science, National Museum of Natural History (in 2019)

Stan – BHI 3033

By far the most duplicated and most exhibited dinosaur in the world. Look for excessively long teeth and a perforated jaw.

As Seen At: Black Hills Institute, Children’s Museum of Indianapolis, National Museum of Natural History, Dinosaur Discovery Museum, Houston Museum of Natural Science, Manchester Museum, Tokyo National Museum of Natural Science, traveling exhibits

Sue – FMNH PR2081

Discovered by Susan Hendrickson and the subject of an ugly 3-year legal battle before being purchased by the Field Museum. The oldest and most complete T. rex known. Look for a longer snout and stubby cocker spaniel legs.

As Seen At: Field Museum of Natural History, Disney World Animal Kingdom, traveling exhibits

Jane – BMRP 2002.4.1

A juvenile Tyrannosaurus discovered in 2001. Look for a scrawny build, gracile legs and a narrow skull.

As Seen At: Burpee Museum of Natural History, Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County